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Neil L. Starr, DDS, PC

Smoking Could Lead to More Cavities



Posted on 4/20/2020 by Neil Starr DDS PC
Smoking Could Lead to More Cavities Smoking is bad for you, anyway you look at it. The large number of toxins in cigarette smoke, besides the nicotine, affects your physical and oral health, and can only worsen your health over time. In fact, if you smoke, you are likely to get more cavities. The following information explains the reasons why this can happen.

How Smoking Triggers Dental Decay

According to the Academy of General dentistry, men lose about three teeth for each 10 years they smoke while women lose about 1.5 teeth every 10 years. Two 30-year studies at Tufts University fond there was a relation between tooth loss and smoking. One theory suggests that smoking restricts oxygen flow, which promote the development of periodontal disease. When the oxygen flow is limited, the nutrients needed to support healthy teeth are restricted as well. Smoking can also cause plaque build-up and tartar accumulation, which leads to gum disease and tooth loss.

How You Can Prevent Tooth Loss

That is why we promote quitting the smoking habit. In fact, we support quitting any form of tobacco use, including chewing tobacco. By following a healthy routine of daily brushing and flossing, you can strengthen your gums and teeth and improve your smile. However, you have to make a commitment to the process – a process that begins with quitting smoking altogether. We can help you with developing healthier dental habits. Start by scheduling an appointment with our office for a cleaning and a checkup. You can stop smoking and break away from habits that may be ruining your smile. Take the initiative by contacting our office today. We can set an appointment for a professional cleaning and exam that fits in nicely with your schedule. If you have not been to our office in the last three months, you should schedule a time for a consultation and exam today. To prevent dental decay and tooth loss, quit smoking, brush and floss daily, and visit our office every six months.


Neil L. Starr, DDS, PC

Washington Office

1234 19th Street N.W. #306
Washington, DC 20036

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