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Neil L. Starr, DDS, PC

Facial Trauma


Facial trauma can be serious, and can have a significant impact on your life. The term facial trauma covers all kinds of injuries to the face and the mouth, including the interior of the mouth. It includes such things as lacerations, burns, fractures and much more. Any type of facial trauma, no matter how minor it may seem at the time, should be addressed right away. Untreated facial trauma, even minor trauma, can quickly lead to later complications. At Neil Starr, DDS, PC, we can provide treatment for facial trauma, helping to restore your oral health, your smile, and your life.

What Causes Facial Trauma?

There are multiple types of facial trauma, including such causes as:
•  Car accidents. Auto accidents are the leading cause of facial trauma.
•  Falls. You can experience facial trauma in the event of a fall, such as falling on a slick surface, falling off of a step ladder, and more.
•  Sports related injuries. These injuries include such things as getting tackled by another player, getting hit in the face with a ball, or being hit with an object such as a stick.
•  Physical altercations. A fistfight or other type of brawl can often lead to facial trauma.

The Types of Facial Trauma

There are a few different types of facial trauma:
•  Soft tissue injuries. These include cuts, burns, and contusions on the soft tissues in and around the mouth.
•  Bone injuries. Bone injuries include fractures to the jaw as well as the bones of the chin, cheeks, eye sockets, nose, and forehead.
•  Tooth injuries. Tooth injuries consist of both complete dislodging as well as partial displacement, such the tooth ending up being forced further into the bone.

Soft Tissue Injuries

Soft tissues are those injuries that affect the soft tissues of the mouth, as well as those around it. Injuries vary from cuts, to burns, to other contusions. The soft tissue of your mouth and face is very delicate. It also contains blood vessels, nerves, and even salivary glands and ducts. When facial trauma affects the condition of your soft tissues, more than just your appearance is affected. Harm may also come to blood vessels, nerve, and the salivary system. Treatment as soon as possible not only helps to restore your appearance, but the functions of these essential components as well.

Bone Injuries

Your facial bones are not unlike the other bones in your body. In the event that a facial bone is fractured, it needs to be set. However, facial bones cannot be set in a cast like other fractured bones can be. In order to help your facial bones heal, there are a couple of different treatments. One such treatment, commonly used in the event of a fractured jaw, is wire. Your jaw is wired closed to prohibit movement of the mouth, which allows it to heal. In other cases, plates and screws may be used. This method allows for the movement of the jaw while you heal.

Tooth Injuries

Tooth injuries are common with facial trauma. In some cases, a tooth may become partially dislodged, or it may be forced deeper into the socket. In either case, it can be reset. Do not attempt to do this on your own. We can carefully set your tooth back into its proper position and apply a splint while the ligaments and bones heal. In other cases, a tooth may get knocked out completely. In many instances, we can replace the tooth, so long as it is in good condition when you come in. If the tooth cannot be reset, we will discuss options for replacement.

All facial trauma, no matter how minor it seems at the time, should be addressed as soon as possible. For more information, or to schedule your consultation, contact Neil Starr DDS PC today at (202) 897-0015.


Neil L. Starr, DDS, PC

Washington Office

1234 19th Street N.W. #306
Washington DC, 20036
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